Serial Communication examples

The "Call and Response" method of serial communication is the most robust way to send data (such as multiple sensors) to and from the Arduino and Processing / P5. Note that is has one disadvantage: the Arduino waits until your receiving software (e.g. Processing) sends something back = i.e. "responds". So it seems frozen and... Continue Reading →

Slide switch circuit

Introducing the Single-Pole, Double-Throw (SPDT) Switch SPDT switches have three legs: one common leg and two legs that vie for connection to the common leg. The common pin is in the middle. It's always connected to one of the outside pins, but which pin it's connected to depends on which way the switch is flipped. However you can use... Continue Reading →

Tamed Digital Devices

SF-SO brings back the tactility of analogue with 'tamed' digital devices In a bid to redefine our relationship with technology and gadgets, design studio SF-SO presents tamed digital devices. the project has been developed in response to the prevalence of digital products in modern society, and their numerous built-in features and functions which, rather than... Continue Reading →

Clock Clock by Human Since 1982

This 50-inch-long digital timepiece is made up of 24 individual analog clocks. Each bank of six clocks forms an individual number in the seven-segment system, creating what is essentially a hacked-together digital display made out of analog parts. The piece “re-contextualizes time in a mix of old and new, analogue and digital,” explain Emanuelsson and... Continue Reading →

Capacitive Sensing example

Here is a good introduction to capacitive sensing. Read through it to see possible uses and helpful tips for making your own. Here is my simplified and clarified revision of the example code: https://gist.github.com/ericjforman/8fd70b69a1751588aee1f9fcffa7cd42 Don't forget to install the CapacitiveSensor library from the Arduino IDE: Go to menu Sketch / Include Library / Manage Libraries, then... Continue Reading →

Ohm’s Law and series/parallel

Power sources connected in series result in their voltage being added together. For example, AA batteries are 1.5V each. So three in series are 4.5V (1.5+1.5+1.5). LEDs use a certain amount of voltage when turned on: Color Typical Forward Voltage (VF) Red, orange 2.0 Yellow 2.1 Green (older yellow-green variety) 2.2 Blue, white, ultraviolet and newer “true”... Continue Reading →

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